• Krosword ni Gerry Gamurot
    Eh Kasi, Pinoy!

    Krosword

    ni Gerry Gamurot
  • Building Science by Norman Aceron Garcia
    Features

    Building Science

    by Norman Aceron Garcia

Ready for Manitoba

New program for Manitoba bound immigrants

   AMBASSADOR PHOTO
 
Canada's Ambassador to the Philippines, Neil Reeder, announces the Ready for Manitoba Program during the embassy’s Study in Canada Fair at the Fairmont in Makati, January 22, 2016

MANILA – A new program designed to help immigrants coming to Manitoba was announced in the Philippines on January 22 at an event sponsored by the Canadian Embassy in Manila. Canada’s Ambassador to the Philippines, Neil Reeder, made the announcement.

The Ready for Manitoba Program (RMP) will assist immigrants from the Philippines, India and China who have met eligibility requirements, including Manitoba-bound immigrants who have been selected by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) or the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP) to become permanent residents. The program will provide services such as information and orientation, employment-related services, and community supports to help immigrants before they arrive to start their new lives in Manitoba.

The RMP was developed at the University of Manitoba in the fall of 2015 in coordination with Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and will be delivered by Extended Education at the U of M with $526,310 in funding over the next fiscal year.

Travellers wary of Zika virus

   Aedes albopictus
 
Aedes aegypti mosquito is a carrier of Zika virus

OTTAWA –  The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) recently reported several cases of Canadians infected with Zika virus, which Margaret Chan, the director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), has described as spreading “explosively” in the Americas.

Zika virus is suspected of causing birth defects known as microcephaly in babies born to infected mothers. Microcephaly is a condition in which a child is born with an abnormally small head and underdeveloped brain. However, the link between Zika and microcephaly has not yet been proven conclusively.